Highlights of eLearning Africa 2018, Social Progress Tech

Source: https://www.moodlenews.com/2018/highlights-of-elearning-africa-2018-social-progress-tech/

Highlights of eLearning Africa 2018, Social Progress Tech
elearning-africa.com

Division, arguably the worst social illness in the world today, and a factor behind most of the recent grueling or just disappointing headlines, is a foe with which the African continentis quite familiar. Centuries old familiar. By design, this fact will be in the minds of organizers, attendees, and speakers at eLearning Africa 2018 in Kigali, Rwanda, next September. The country’s Minister of Education, the World Bank’s Margot Brown, and a selection of experts in learning and social leaders have heeded the call to join talks about “Education, Training & Skills Development” and the role of ICT to spread values across the continent.

Social Progress Moodle

When it comes to proven technologies whose impact on learning outcomes is able to scale and transcend the classroom, Moodle should come to mind. Over half a dozen talks and workshops will cover how Moodle’s features can serve EdTech’s increasingly wide range of action, from classroom management and engagement through gamification, to skill intervention and competencies for farmers in rural areas. Some of the Moodle-related interventions during the 3-day event are:
  • “Moodle LMS as a gamification platform” during the “Gamification and the Power of Play” workshop by Natalie Denmeade from Moojoo, Zanzibar
  • “Creation of Interactive Learning Materials” by David Campbell from the Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Japan
  • “Moodle for Thesis Supervision: Academic Experience in Universities” by David Situma from the Africa International University, kenya
  • “Reaching an Illiterate Target Group with an Interactive Moodle App” by Andreas Hoerfurter from common sense Learning & training consultants, Austria

eLearning Africa may not demonstrate beyond a doubt that EdTech is the cure for all of our issues, but that it can be a clear attempt to tackle them, even if only to bring new light to the issues. And when the opportunity does not involve an industry, but rather social groups, the ability to put new solutions in the hands of as many as possible makes Open Source an incontestable proposition. (Not saying EdTech in Africa cannot be remarkably profitable.) If new technology earns a name for the way they advance specific fields, like “FinTech,” why not framing Moodle and similar Social Progress technologies as “SoProTech”?

Learn more at elearning-africa.com. ■

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